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The “Times Up Act” – Connecticut Sexual Harassment Regulation Reminders
Pocket Watch
September 27, 2019

New Connecticut Sexual Harassment Regulations

A reminder that new Connecticut sexual harassment training and notice regulations become effective on October 1 of this year – see my post from earlier this year for more information.

These new requirements…

“Times Up Act” – Sexual Harassment Requirements

Training

For employers with at least one (1) employee:

  • The new regulations require employers to provide two hours of training for all supervisors. This training must be completed within one (1) year from October 1, 2019.
  • New supervisors must receive training within six (6) months from date of hire, or promotion.
  • Supervisors that have already received training after October 1, 2018 do not need to receive training again.

For employers with at least three (3) employees:

  • For employers with greater than three (3) employees, all employees must receive two hours of training within one (1) year of October 1, 2019.
  • New employees must receive training within six (6) months from date of hire.
  • Employees that have already received training after October 1, 2018 do not need to receive training again.

This act requires the Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities (CHRO) to develop free on-line, or other interactive method training that employers can use. Look for this on the CHRO website.

In addition to training requirements, this new law also requires the following notice requirements:

Notice

Employers must provide notice to employees:

  • In addition to current posting requirements, “information concerning the illegality of sexual harassment and remedies available to victims of sexual harassment” to each employee. New employees must receive this notice within three (3) months from date of hire.
  • Information may be provided by e-mail only if the employer has provided the employee with an electronic mail account or the employee has provided the employer with an electronic mail account.
  • If an employer has not provided an electronic mail account to an employee, the employer must post this information on the employer’s internet website, if the employer maintains such a site.
  • Or, an employer can provide a link to the CHRO’s website concerning the illegality of sexual harassment and the remedies available to victims of sexual harassment.
Nick Daukas

Nick Daukas

Author

With 25+ years of HR experience Nick specializes in ER, OD, Recruitment and Legal Compliance. He has an MBA and holds advanced HR certifications SPHR, SHRM-SCP.

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